center for women and family
counseling and integrative health services

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The Center for Women and Family sees confidentiality and privacy as a fundamental building blocks of the therapeutic 
relationship

Thus,  we respect and uphold Texas and federal laws  regarding your mental health records. Please note that it is our practice to require WRITTEN consent for any disclosures of client information not described as an exception according to law. 



confidentiality exceptions

  • If  there is even the suspicion of abuse of a child, elder, or disabled person(s) this will be reported to the appropriate state agencies, such as Child Protective Services.
  • If a client threatens to harm self, a therapist will enlist his/her cooperation in an attempt ensure personal safety, and if client is not cooperative in safety planning, further steps may be taken by the therapist within the confines of state laws and without the permission of the client.
  • If a client threatens serious bodily harm on another individual, a therapist will report to authorities, as well as the intended victim to ensure their safety.
  • The therapist must also comply with the letter of the law and release information when privilege does not supersede warrants, subpoena, or other mandated legal writs.
  • Client may request records at any time, we ask that this be done in writing and recipients of information must be named.  There may be a fee for duplicate copies or requested records.  Please explore the information below regarding access to mental health records. 



notice of privacy practice

Most of us feel that our health information is private and should be protected. That is why there is a federal law that sets rules for health care providers and health insurance companies about who can look at and receive our health information. This law, called the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), gives you rights  over your health information, including the right to get a copy of your information, make sure it is correct, and know who has seen it.


communicating between providers

There is a federal law, called the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), that sets rules for health care providers and health plans about who can look at and receive your health information, including those closest to you – your family members and friends. The HIPAA Privacy Rule ensures that you have  rights over your health information, including the right to get your information, make sure it’s correct, and know who has seen it.